Monthly Archives: January 2015

Kirsty Smith

By Kirsty Smith

Jan 28th 2015

Author Feed

“Inclusion is not just about disability, inclusion is about everybody.”

Categories: Advocacy, CRPD, Development, Disability Inclusion, Inclusive, People with disabilities, Training, Uncategorized

I’m in Bangkok this week taking part in the first CBM joint Disability Inclusive Development (DID) training – ensuring that people with disabilities are included and involved in all development activity. The workshop is aimed at sharing international experiences of disability inclusive development and discussing good practice.

The workshop started today with participants from all nine CBM regions, four member associations, and international office to share experiences, good practice, resources, expertise, but also challenges faced whilst working towards disability inclusion.

The first day’s main focus was learning from examples from six regions in sessions that were facilitated in a very lively and creative manner.

A common point of discussion was moving from a mere welfare approach to a rights based development approach along the empowerment framework, and from a bilateral cooperation between CBM and the organisations it supports towards a true partnership that promotes mutual learning between the organisations.

A key issue discussed was the alliance with Disabled People’s Organisations which, because of their expertise, have an important role in the promotion of inclusion. Different strategies and methodologies for their involvement were discussed, and it was remarked that CBM has to not only look inwards but also acknowledge the different roles of stakeholders to ensure we draw on their specific strengths.

CBM’s role was seen to facilitate the link between disability stakeholders, as well as with mainstream organisations, governments, technical and finance partners. It was acknowledged that in order to influence change, DPOs require capacity development to enhance their professionalism.

The benefits of involvement of DPOs on these different levels are:

  • Increased self-esteem
  • Improved academic, vocational and/or professional skills
  • Improved socialisation
  • Improved awareness of disability rights, participation and accessibility
  • Increased understanding of structures and processes
  • Improved leadership skills
  • Increased understanding of relations on all levels, from grassroots to global

These will together lead to increased empowerment.

One of the important learnings of the day was the importance of gender sensitivity in our work, for example not just disaggregation of data by gender but also breaking down the data for people with disabilities by gender, keeping the gender lens during implementation, featuring men in our documentation and footage, and ensuring men are allies.

Quote of the day:

“It causes the partner problems if they learn that I am coming to visit them.” (from a CBM staff member using a wheelchair)

“Inclusion is not just about disability, inclusion is about everybody.” (from a CBM staff member)

Laura Gore

By Laura Gore

Jan 9th 2015

Author Feed

Angelito de diós – Tiny Jeick’s fight for sight

Categories: Blindness, Child, Training, Uncategorized, Vision 2020

I’m the Programme Manager for CBM UK and I visited Luz and her family when I was in Peru. I am enclosing a short report that I wrote after my visit.…

I met Jeick and his mother Luz at their home in Lima, Peru, where they live with Luz’s mother, four brothers and sisters and their children. A small space for such a large family.

Luz explained about the traumatic birth of Jeick which resulted in him being born prematurely at 27 weeks, weighing just over 1kg.  Luz became upset as she described the experience which bought back memories of how she felt at the time, not knowing if her son was going to live or die, let alone see.

Luz had to leave Jeick in hospital after just three days, where he stayed for a further two months.  She struggled to look after her other two children and visit the hospital every day to see Jeick. It took Luz an hour and a half to reach the hospital each day and the costs soon started to add up.

Luz showed us photos of Jeick from when he was born and still in an incubator. He looked so tiny and vulnerable.

Jeick was regularly screened for ROP where staff had been trained by CBM’s partners in Lima.  At three months old he was diagnosed with ROP and given an urgent appointment.   But by this point Luz could not afford to pay for the transport to hospital and so they could not make this first appointment.

When we stepped in to pay for her transport, our ophthalmologist was able to urgently conduct the laser treatment and after a short stay in hospital Jeick was able to return home.

It’s been over four months now since Jeick had his treatment and his vision continues to develop extremely well; early signs are that he will have good eye sight and potentially not even require glasses.

Luz told us how thankful she was for the treatment and support she received from CBM It was a real inspiration to meet Luz and hear about her experience and how CBM had made such a vital difference to their lives – not only had we provided sight saving treatment, but we also supported Luz in the rehabilitation process. Luz says she is very grateful for the treatment that Jeick received thanks to the programme and is very happy that her “angelito de diós” (little angel of God) is doing so well now.

Seeing Jeick now, you would never know what a traumatic experience he and his family went through. A real pleasure to see such a happy family.