Monthly Archives: March 2015

Rosi Jack

By Rosi

Mar 13th 2015

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Celebrating a mother’s love and care – Mother’s Day

Categories: CBM, Child, People with disabilities, Poverty, Uganda

As the UK celebrates Mothering Sunday this weekend, 15th March, we’d like to tell you about one very special mother. Roy is 26 years old and has four children. She lives with her husband Ronald and four children in a remote village in Uganda, East Africa, about 100km northeast of the capital, Kampala.

Roy encourages Denis to drink some tea after surgery

Roy encourages Denis to drink some tea after surgery

Like millions of mothers around the world, Roy works hard to support and care for her children. It’s not easy to bring in enough money for the day-to-day essentials and school fees for her two older children – primary education is not free in Uganda. She and Ronald eke out a living growing sweet potatoes, maize and beans and making bricks.

But what makes Roy particularly amazing is that one of her four children – Denis, aged 8 – is actually her half-brother. He came to live with Roy and Ronald just a year ago. We’ve been sharing Denis’ story recently as thanks to CBM supporters, he is currently being treated for Blount’s Disease, which causes his legs to bend and makes walking slow and painful.

Denis had been abandoned by his biological mother and was living with his father.  But he was not treated well.“While all other children at my father’s place were sent to school, Denis was neglected. He didn’t bring the boy to a doctor or send him to school. Instead the father gave him funny and abusive names because of his disability. He has even beaten the boy”, explains Roy.

Sadly, due to the stigma attached to disability and the lack of support and education for parents, this story is all too common. But Roy looked at Denis and saw a boy who needed love and care. She took him in and is now mother to him, along with her three other children.

Without treatment, Roy knows that Denis’ future would probably be bleak. “If he remains with this condition he will face very difficult times in future. He may never be independent. He may need help at all times. He will have a lot of pain and his mobility will always be limited. And he might never find a woman who wants to marry him”.

But the treatment for Blounts’ Disease is far from easy for an 8 year-old to go through.  Denis spent a tearful night in hospital before his surgery, a long way from home.  Since initial surgery to straighten his leg, he has to wear a metal brace or “fixator” on his leg, with daily physiotherapy exercises that often cause him pain.

Roy learns how to help Denis with his physiotherapy exercises

Roy learns how to help Denis with his physiotherapy exercises

It’s hard to imagine how a child could go through treatment like Denis’ without a mother’s love and support. Roy is with him every step of the way. At hospital, hers was the first face he saw when waking up from surgery, encouraging him to drink some tea and then have a rest. Before travelling home with him, she learned about the exercises he must do to ensure that his leg heals strong.  Every day, she encourages him to do his exercises, encouraging him to persevere in spite of the pain.  She must also work hard to help Denis keep his wound clean to prevent infection – not easy when you live in a dusty environment with no electricity or running water at home.

CBM supporters, outreach workers and doctors are all playing a vital role in helping Denis on his treatment journey, which is vital for him to build a better future. But without Roy by his side, showing him a true mother’s love and care,  none of this would be possible.

More about Denis’ journey of hope.

Roy helps Denis walk with his crutches

Roy helps Denis walk with his crutches

Denis, Roy and family at home

Denis, Roy and family at home

Dave Taylor

By Dave Taylor

Mar 3rd 2015

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The cost of twiglets

Categories: CBM, climate change, Development, Disability Inclusion, Inclusive, People with disabilities

A packet of twiglets costs the same as a month's savings for a farmer in Madhya Pradesh

I’ve just returned from a trip to India where I visited one of our CBM partners, Naman Sewa Samiti, in rural poor Madyha Pradesh. I was there to visit an inspiring project, Inclusive Organic Farming. On my outward journey, at Heathrow Airport, I bought a packet of twiglets; little did I know then, how valuable they were!

Betul District in Madhya Pradesh, is deemed by the Indian government to be one of 250 poorest areas in the whole of the country. To live here is to know what it is like to lack clean water, to live in poverty, and to struggle for hope.

Imagine then, living against this backdrop with a disability. There is no NHS, no benefit system. Yes, extended family and the sense of community are impressive support systems, that have long since disappeared from the so-called ‘developed’ world, but in rural India, despite being officially outlawed, the deeply-rooted caste system is strong and pervades religious belief.

Slum community, Betul - the poorest place in one of India's poorest regions

This is not good news for the person with a disability. Some see them as having bad karma, people guilty of some misdemeanour in a previous life.This means that discrimination abounds towards  people with a disability. Too often, they are disempowered, considered to be of far less value to employers, and sometimes, abandoned in their home or pushed out to beg on the street.

Inclusive Organic Farming

CBM UK Partner Naman Sewa Samiti has been working with with people with diabilities in the area since 1994. Historically this has been done through spice making, cooperative and credit banking, self help groups and health education.

Since 2004 Naman has been working with farmers living with a disability, or those caring for a family member with a disability, and empowering them in a new, accessible, far more cost-effective and productive way of farming; organic farming. The results have been stunning. The stories of transformation moving and inspiring.

Take Gajanand and Sangwata for example. Proud parents to twin boys Atul and Praful. Their boys were born with extra special needs, and life has been a struggle. Like most people in the area they are farmers. Farming is difficult enough, but throw in twins into the equation, especially twins with extra needs and challenges and, well, you can imagine.

When the boys were 8, their mum and dad had to make the gut-wrenching decision to  send them away to a residential special school, miles from the famiily home. The lack of transport meant that Gajanand and Sangwata did not see their precious boys for weeks, even months at a time. Even if they could have got there, they were in financial dire straits brought on by their inability to pay for the chemicals to sustain their farming. They were desperate.

Gajanand and Sangwata - working for their boys' future

One day a field-worker from CBM UK Partner, Naman, got to hear of their plight. The couple were introduced to Inclusive Organic Farming. Over the following year, their fortunes were turned around. They came to realise that organic farming, a method in this part of the world that uses plentiful natural resources such as animal dung and aromatic leaves, would cost them next to nothing. They applied, were interviewed, and joined the programme, one that involves checks/inspections, transparency and accountability.

Gajanand and Sangwata were able to grow their customer base, sell at the market and earn more. The small savings that they have been able to make has resulted in more visits to see their boys, and enabled them to put aside some money to contribute to their sons’ future security.

Not only that, they are both now involved in running groups for other parents and farmers who find themselves facing similar struggles.

The ugly face of poverty

I have seen many times, the ugly face of poverty, and how it blights beautiful people. I am sick of it. I hate it. Seems to me we have three fundamental choices that confront us individually and as a society. We can ignore it, pretend that over two thirds of the planet’s population do not live this way, we can see it and choose to do nothing about it, paralysed by our own lack of resources or the sheer size of the task before us, or we can try to play our small part in eradicating the obscenity and injustice of poverty.

I am so grateful to CBM UK that they consider I have a ‘few tools in the box’ to play my part. But if poverty is going to be tackled we all need to be on board. If we are going to see a fairer allocation of resources and wealth, then those of us who are in a privileged position to generate some, should, in my opinion, give some of that away. Actually it’s not all about giving, because there is something in the way that we are wired, that makes US, that makes me, feel good when we give. Giving is receving. Who doesn’t want to feel good? Who doesn’t like receiving something?

I want to shamelessly pull on your heart strings (and your purse strings for that matter). Look into the eyes of Raja, aged 6, living in a slum with a learning disability. Aged 6! He’s gorgeous, beautiful, but poverty has got him, and millions like him, around the throat and is strangling his life and hope for the future.

Humour me, just for 30 seconds. Look into Raja’s stunning eyes, and think. Think about yourself, think about your family, your loved ones, your friends. Then look up and give thanks for the roof that is over your head, and as you look up, offer up a thought/prayer for Raja, and ask how you can help, how you can play your part in loosening the grip of poverty.

Raja, aged 6, he wants to be a cricketer! He has a profound learning disability and lives with his mum in a slum community