Category Archives: CBM

Hannah Loryman

By Hannah Loryman

Dec 3rd 2015

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Promoting empowerment and access for all: lessons from Disabled People’s Organisations

Categories: CBM, Disability, Disability Inclusion, Inclusive, People with disabilities, Uncategorized

Today we are celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities. This day, which happens every year on the 3 December, is an opportunity to raise awareness of  the importance of including people with disabilities in all areas of society. Each year the United Nations sets a theme, this year it is Inclusion matters: access and empowerment for people of all abilities.

We talk about access a lot, and it is hugely important. People with disabilities need to be able to access all the same services and opportunities as people without – they need to be able to go to school, access health care and earn an income. They may also need access to specific services – such as rehabilitation or assistive devices, such as wheelchairs.

What is meant by empowerment is less obvious. But it is equally, if not more, important. Empowerment is about people being able to have a voice and take control of their own lives and futures. All people, whether they have a disability or not, need to be involved in the decisions that affect their lives.

Mourine, who is blind, is an active member of a Disabled People’s Organisation supported by CBM in Cameroon. She credits the group not only with transforming her life but also to changing attitudes in her community. “Before, you could hardly find a person with disability even coming out of the house, but now, they come out, they participate in social activities, they belong to groups, they are able to contribute in social life, even in politics”. Read Mourine’s story. (Photo: CBM Australia)

People with disabilities know best what barriers they face, and they are able to identify what they need to overcome them. If people with disabilities aren’t involved in the development of programmes and policies then the likelihood is that they will continue to be excluded from them. People with disabilities need to be able to participate in decision making at all levels – from community to global decision making, so that they are not passive recipients of aid, but included in their own development.

I recently got back from the Philippines, where I spent some time with members of local Disabled People’s Organisations who were receiving support from CBM and partners. Here I saw how important empowerment is to unlock the potential of people with disabilities and to deliver real change.

Being part of a Disabled Person’s Organisation had transformed many of their lives. Before being involved in these groups, some of them were isolated in their communities, but now they have an increased awareness of their rights and the opportunities available to them and have become key members of their communities.

One group has been counting the number of people with disabilities in their district, with this information they can go to their government and demand that they meet their needs. Someone else told us about how after one of their group was killed by a police officer, they came together and made sure that the police officer was arrested and charged. Others were making sure that schools in their area had the right policies in place – so that children with disabilities were able to receive an education.

By having a voice and being able to take control of their own lives – they have not only been able to change their own lives – but also the lives of others.

In less than a month, the Sustainable Development Goals, which were agreed by world leaders in September, will come into action. They commit countries to eradicating poverty, fighting inequality and reducing the impact of climate change by 2030. Crucially for CBM, and for the one billion people with disabilities globally, this new agenda pledges to ‘Leave no one behind.’

As part of their training in the Philippines, participants learnt about the Sustainable Development Goals and linked them to issues that affect their everyday lives. They now have the information they need to go their government as say ‘you signed up to this, so this is the action you need to take.’

DPO in the Philippines maps their work against the Sustainable Development Goals (Photo: CBM/Loryman)

The Sustainable Development Goals are a once in a generation opportunity to create an equal and inclusive society where people with disabilities have the same access to opportunities as those without. If people with disabilities are able to raise their voice and demand their rights – the impact could be truly transformative.

This week to celebrate International day for Persons with Disabilities, we will be sharing ten stories of people with disability from around the world. To read these stories, please click here.

Heather Pearson

By Heather Pearson

Oct 8th 2015

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World Mental Health Day 2015: Addressing mental health in the poorest communities of the world

Categories: Adult, Advocacy, CBM, Development, Disability, Mental health, People with disabilities, Uncategorized

October 10th is World Mental Health Day. This year we address a key issue facing people living with psychosocial disabilities (disabilities caused by mental illness): dignity.

The theme chosen for October 10, 2015 is “Dignity in mental health”. The word ‘dignity’ comes from the Latin word meaning worthiness.  It is the idea that everyone has the right to be valued and respected. But taking it one step further, dignity is also about how people feel: treating someone in a way that they feel valued and feel respected. When people are living with dignity, they feel confident and they are able to make decisions for themselves.

Worldwide, high levels of stigma and discrimination strip people with psychosocial disabilities of dignity and prevent them from the experience of living as, and being treated as, equal members of society.

Imelda (17yrs) has schizophrenia. Imelda's parents kept her and her brother locked away.

At CBM, we believe that all people with disabilities deserve to live in a world that treats them with dignity. Here are 3 ways that we believe can promote the dignity of people with psychosocial disabilities:

1) Creating accessible, people-centred care following a humanitarian emergency

Knowing that disasters can negatively influence the mental health of a population, CBM sees humanitarian emergencies as an opportunity to ‘build back better.’ In Sierra Leone, for example, the Ebola virus disease outbreak impacted the mental health of the country in many ways. Not one person was excluded from the experience of stress, fear and loss. CBM used this opportunity to mobilize resources and establish, with other partners, 14 mental health units across the country. Previous to the outbreak, mental health care was only available at the Psychiatric Hospital and in a couple of health units outside of the capital city. Similarly, in the Philippines, following Typhoon Haiyan, CBM used the opportunity to establish mental health units with trained staff who could visit and support people with psychosocial disabilities in their communities.

Creating accessible mental health care following an emergency seeks to reduce the long term psychological impacts of a disaster. However, it also brings care closer to people with psychosocial disabilities, allowing them to rebuild their lives with dignity: close to their homes and families with trained staff who treat them with respect.

2) Supporting opportunities for voices to be heard

A CBM-supported Block Printing Unit in Pozhiyoor, Kerala where 13 members (mental health patients and their carers) produce printed cloths for sale.

A CBM-supported Block Printing Unit in Pozhiyoor, Kerala where 13 members (mental health patients and their carers) produce printed cloths for sale.

An important part of dignity is providing people with the opportunity to make choices and to have control in their lives. It is not enough to speak on behalf of people with psychosocial disabilities. Instead, what is needed is environments that offer support and build confidence, so that people with psychosocial disabilities can find and use their voices.

Maya Angelou put it best when she defined dignity: “Dignity. It means a belief in oneself, that one is worthy of the best. It means that what I have to say is important, and I will say it when it’s important for me to say it. Dignity really means that I deserve the best treatment I can receive. And that I have the responsibility to give the best treatment I can to other people.”

Since 2008, CBM has supported the Presbyterian Community Based Rehabilitation (PCBR) programme based in Northern Ghana, to establish self-help groups (SHGs) with the aim of providing mutual support, and enabling people to re-enter the community, both socially and economically. Now, with over 23 SHGs throughout the upper east region, the groups provide an important source of support to people with psychosocial disabilities and their families. Through the groups, members have been able to challenge discrimination, share support and advice, and attain financial security in a resource poor setting.

3) Advocating for change in global priorities

While local developments, such as the establishment of services and self-help groups, are necessary to promote dignity, progress on a global level is equally important.

In September, 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were launched. The SDGs build on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and clearly state the priorities for governments and development agencies over the next 15 years. During the drafting process, FundaMentalSDG was formed: an alliance of organizations who believe in a common vision of seeing the SDGs consider the needs of people with psychosocial disabilities.

When the UN adopted the SDGs in September this year, we saw the exciting inclusion of mental health and well-being in the document. This success is in part due to the work of FundaMentalSDG, of which CBM is a founding member.

Mental health was not mentioned in the MDGs. Therefore, the inclusion of mental health and well-being in the SDGs indicates an increased respect for people with psychosocial disabilities on a global level. Equally important, we anticipate a greater investment in interventions that will lead to less human rights abuses against people with psychosocial disabilities.

On World Mental Health Day 2015, we are promoting the value and worth of people living with psychosocial disabilities. Whether we invest in improving access to care, the establishment of self-help groups or changing global priorities …it should all be done in the name of dignity.

“Things have a price and can be for sale but people have a dignity that is priceless and worth far more than things.”  – Pope Francis

Hannah Loryman

By Hannah Loryman

Sep 8th 2015

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International Literacy Day: Disability, Education and the SDGs

Categories: Advocacy, CBM, Child, Development, Disability, Disability Inclusion, Education, Inclusive, Inclusive education, Post-2015, Uncategorized

The ability to read and write is hugely powerful. Women who can read have fewer children later in life, and the children they do have are much more likely to survive. Being literate helps people to find jobs, access information and make decisions about their lives.

Today, on International Literacy Day (8th September), we think about the 781 million adults who cannot read, write or count, and about what needs to be done to make sure that they have the opportunities to gain these valuable skills.

In 2014, CBM trained more than 2,700 special education teachers worldwide.

While the data is poor, we know that people with disabilities often have lower levels of literacy than people without disabilities. This is hardly surprising when you consider that in developing countries, as many as 9 out of 10 children with disabilities do not go to school.

In the last 15 years there has been a huge global effort to get more children enrolled in primary school. This has led to a drop in the number of children out of school from 100 million in 2000 to 57 million today. While this progress is huge, many children with disabilities have been left behind. In many low and middle income countries, having a disability more than doubles the chance of a child not going to school. In Nepal for example, 85% of children out of school have a disability.

If they do attend school, children living with disabilities are often more likely to drop out and leave school early. They are also less likely to be able to learn – because schools are not correctly equipped, teachers are not trained or because they are discriminated against. Often getting children in to school and making sure they have the opportunity to learn vital skills such as reading and writing involves small changes; in teaching methods, in physical accessibility or even just in attitude.

Illiteracy among adults with disabilities is even more prevalent than among children, because those who are adults today were less likely to attend school that today’s children. To address this, adult literacy programmes need to be inclusive of people with disabilities. More broadly, we need to make sure that information is provided in alternative formats so that those who are unable to read can still access it.

CBM develops safe, welcoming and accessible schools for children with disabilities. © Robin Wyatt 2014: see www.robinwyatt.org

Goal 4 in the new Sustainable Development Goals recognises the importance of inclusive education and promotes learning for all, including lifelong learning. This is a huge step forward and an important opportunity to ensure that people with disabilities have the same chance to become literate as their non-disabled peers. CBM is advocating that in the indicators that measure the new goals school enrolment is broken down by disability. Because only when we have good data about how many children with disabilities are not in school will we really be able to reach them all. We are also advocating for an indicator on the number of trained teachers to teach children with special educational needs; because getting children into school is not enough.

We often talk about the cycle of poverty and disability, the fact that disability causes poverty, and poverty causes disability. Literacy is one way of breaking this cycle – because when people learn to read and write they are more able to participate in society and have the power to change their own lives.

Kirsty Smith

By Kirsty Smith

Jul 31st 2015

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We need to build back a better Nepal with disabled people

Categories: Adult, CBM, Disaster, Inclusive, Nepal, People with disabilities, Poverty
Kirsty Smith, Chief Exectuve of CBM UK in Nepal

Kirsty Smith, Chief Executive of CBM UK in Nepal

Nepal is not Haiti. The scale of the earthquake is of course very different. Around 8,800 people were killed in the first quake of 25 April, and a further hundred in the second quake in May. In Haiti the numbers reached 200,000 including many senior civil servants which effectively meant that large parts of the government became dysfunctional or non-existent. This is not at all the case in Nepal where the government is clearly structured and very active in the earthquake response, working alongside agencies such as CBM to distribute emergency relief as well as post-emergency non-food items such as tarpaulins, sanitary kits and corrugated iron sheeting. However, people with disabilities are disproportionately affected at times of crisis and my time spent in Nepal demonstrates clearly how the often sporadic and uneven response often fails to reach those who need it most.

I am wandering through the rubble strewn streets of Bhaktapur with social worker Pramita. We pass a line of people waiting for government relief who have been standing in the sun for several hours. At the front of the queue, the crowd at the kiosk window is 3 people thick and I try to imagine how someone with reduced mobility or a wheelchair user would be able to get to the front.  “What happens if someone can’t come to collect relief supplies themselves?” I ask, thinking of others in more remote rural areas who may live several hours walk from anywhere accessible by road. “They ask a relative or neighbour to come for them, “ Pramita replies. “What happens if the relative or neighbour was killed or injured themselves, or is unable to spare so much time?” I ask. She sighs. “Then they might miss out,” she admits.

I learn more about the reality of this when I visit CBM partner, the National Federation of the Disabled Nepal (NFDN), an umbrella organisation representing a network of disability-specific bodies. The National President, Shudarson Subedi, describes story after story from these member organisations describing people with disabilities who were often just not aware of relief opportunities available, or unable to reach the distribution points which were many hours down steep hillsides.

NFDN has responded to this in a range of ways, including a project to introduce radio and SMS alerts to ensure those with hearing or sight impairment are aware of all rehabilitation opportunities. However, their most powerful approach has been in finding a stronger voice in the country’s rehabilitation efforts, working closely with the government to ensure that the “building back better” efforts are inclusive not only of people with disabilities but are inclusive of all those with specific and needs. In addition, they are helping to increase the extent to which people with disabilities are active participants in the decision making about reconstruction of health, education and livelihood systems and structures.

Patients evacuated from CBM partner Hospital and rehabilitation Centre for Disabled Children (HRDC) on 12 May.

Patients evacuated from CBM partner Hospital and rehabilitation Centre for Disabled Children (HRDC) on 12 May.

The next day I visit new CBM partner, the Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Centre in Kavre, which normally caters to around 40 patients with spinal cord injuries but is currently housing 110. To cope with this dramatic increase in numbers, CBM is supporting the hospital with emergency wheelchairs and anti-pressure sore cushions for earthquake affected patients. SIRC Director, Esha Thapa, explains that they might normally expect a patient to spend 3-6 months with them undergoing surgery and then extensive therapy and rehabilitation. However, with only 10 occupational therapists in the whole country, the rehabilitation phase is likely to take longer for so many new patients. SIRC would also expect to carry out around 50 home modifications in a year, but 90% of the patients who have been admitted with earthquake injuries have lost their homes.

We visit the stepdown facilities – huge tents erected in the hospital grounds – which allow those who have received surgery and rehabilitation at the hospital but who are not quite ready to leave the hospital. They can spend two weeks staying in the tents, being observed as they learn new ways of coping with daily tasks. The burden of this sudden physical trauma and the aftercare is a heavy burden not only on the injured person but also on their family or friends who stay with them at the hospital as primary carer. Esha describes one patient brought in by her neighbour who was forced to discharge herself far too early because the neighbour’s husband wanted her at home.  Another left hospital before receiving any of her physical therapy treatment plan because she was frightened of missing out on the relief materials being distributed in her village.

But some are there for the longer term. One young boy was carried by his neighbours from the ruins of his collapsed house in which his parents were killed. But with no family and no home to return him to, they were unwilling to take him back once his treatment had been completed. Another man, having seen the photographs of his own destroyed house and the devastation of most of his village, had no desire at all to go home.

CBM has been working with local partners in Nepal for 30 years and the CBM country office and emergency response unit were able to respond within hours of the earthquake starting. CBM will be there not just for the weeks and months that follow the earthquake but, continuing to work through local partners and influence the government, for the years that will be needed to ensure that the post-emergency response and the rebuilding of the country’s structures and systems are inclusive.

More about CBM’s emergency response in Nepal

News: Nepal will rise again…but it will take decades

Laura Gore

By Laura Gore

Jul 27th 2015

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A brighter future

Categories: Blindness, Cataract, CBM, Child, Disability, Tanzania

Late last year,  I had the opportunity to meet Valieth and Susana, two young sisters who had been identified through a community screening. They both had congenital cataracts. We arrived at their home and were greeted by the girl’s grandmother Fausta. As the she told us about their life and the challenges that she faced trying to take care of two young girls, she soon broke down in tears.

Fausta told me about the Bible verse that has helped her get through the hard times and give her the strength she needed and it is a verse that I have reflected on many times since my visit. James 1:12 Blessed is theLaura Gore, CBM UK Programme Manager meeting 2 girls with cataracts in tanzania. man who remains steadfast under trial, for when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life which God has promised to those who love him.

Although I knew that the surgery for the girls would not be some magical fix for the family’s hard life, I knew that it would ease the burdens they face and provide the girls with a brighter future, giving the girls an opportunity when they grow up to repay their grandmother for her love and kindness.

When I returned to meet them at the end of June, I was not disappointed. I was greeted by the Fausta and the girls, who skipped and danced around me. Smiles beamed from their faces and I could see instantly that the support that CBM had given for the surgery was life changing. They were delighted with the teddy bears that had been given to CBM by one of our supporters and continued to play as I talked to Fausta, and I knew that for Valieth and Susana that life had changed for the better.

I showed the family a printed version of their story with photos from last year, and they gathered around remembering the day that they had travelled to hospital and had their sight restored. I also shared with Fausta prayers from supporters in the UK for which she was truly touched. I felt humbled by the thanks that she gave to CBM and wished that our supporters could feel this joy first hand.

The girls have been back to the hospital for follow up, but will need to go again, it is likely that they will both need glasses and Valieth will potentially need more treatment on one of her eyes to ensure she has the best vision possible. But the future is looking brighter now, the girls are enrolled in school and are fulfilling Fausta’s dream of getting an education.

Read more about Valieth and Susana’s story here

Inclusive humanitarian response – change is coming!

Categories: CBM, Disability, Disability Inclusion, DRR, Earthquake, Emergency Appeal, Inclusive, Nepal, People with disabilities, Training, Uncategorized

I arrived in Nepal on May 12th, some hours after the massive aftershock that caused more casualties and a number of additional damages to properties and infrastructure.

I could see in the faces of people how their lives were shaken again, and how they didn’t see where and how to ensure the safety of themselves and their families. My first night in Kathmandu was broken by a number of aftershocks that woke me up and made me run outside in search of safety.

Though earthquakes are not new to me, every time it makes me realise how frightening they are, bringing a feeling of helplessness.

Three weeks later, life has become quasi-normal in Kathmandu, with its traffic jams, crowds in the street, shops and restaurants all open. If you don’t travel to affected areas you won’t see that two major earthquakes hit the city only few weeks back. Though people are still talking a lot about them and every day small aftershocks remind all of us that it has happened.

Working with partners – ensuring inclusion

It’s been three weeks of working with partners to provide support to the most affected people, to raise awareness about persons with disabilities and older people and to make sure that all of them are included and have equal access to relief, despite the challenges posed by isolated and remote villages and the upcoming rainy season.

Receiving medicines at a relief camp organized by CBM partner HRDC (Hospital and Rehabilitation Centre for Disabled Children)

Our partners are doing a great job to save lives and contribute to the effort made to assist people in need through trauma care and rehabilitation, organising medical outreach camps, providing psychosocial support – trying to help people to regain independence and normality in their lives. However, we still hear stories from persons with disabilities and older people not being able to access distribution points and being left behind – unintentionally – by relief stakeholders. It is a hard job to reach out to the most at-risk, as often they are not informed, cannot reach the front of the queue and their voices are not heard.

What would you do?

What would you do to find food if you are an 80 year-old man living more than a three-hour walk far from the main road and next city? You will walk downhill, hoping to access a relief package, and then find out that you have to carry a 30 kg bag back uphill …and that you can’t do it. You will seek support, but all other people are also too busy trying to survive to help you.

What would you do if you are a blind person trying to find out where distributions are happening and how to access them, only to discover that you have to compete to be front of the queue as there are not enough supplies for all? Obviously you’ll be at a disadvantage, and most likely you’ll lose out.

What would you do if you are a deaf person, having been transferred by helicopter to Kathmandu for trauma care and have no clue of what is happening to you as no one can communicate with you?

These are only few stories, but many more like this are reported every day…

It is great that donors and organisations are moving towards inclusive policies and frameworks, but exclusion happens on the field. What would you do if you were that relief worker and have limited aid to distribute? Field workers must be supported to turn inclusive policies into inclusive humanitarian action.

Advocating for inclusion

CBM works with our partner the National Federation of Disabled in Nepal (NFDN), supporting them to identify persons with disability and older people and assess their needs to then mobilise humanitarian stakeholders to respond to them. It is very encouraging as many of these organisations are willing to make the extra effort, but lack knowledge or information to ensure inclusion.

Bhojraj Ghimire, CIL Kathmandu (checked shirt) takes part in the workshop on disability inclusion organised by CBM and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in Kathmandu

Bhojraj Ghimire, CIL Kathmandu (checked shirt) takes part in the workshop on disability inclusion organised by CBM and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in Kathmandu

Early last week I gave a two-hour orientation on disability inclusion to Red Cross staff, and the head of the delegation said:

“The Red Cross movement was created to help the most difficult to reach and the ones who couldn’t care for themselves, and yet in our response we reach only the easy one. We need to make the extra effort to access all those who are living in remote areas, who are facing barriers to access relief and whose rights we should protect.”

Well, this kind of statement and willingness to walk the extra miles is very encouraging as it will support the relief worker to pay attention and develop the mechanisms to help the older man to carry home his 30 Kg of goods, the blind person to find the distribution point and be in front of the queue or the deaf person to access a sign language interpreter to understand what is happening to him and get news from his family.

I will travel back to Europe soon but I’m confident that our partners will continue to raise their voices and to make them heard by all. Change is coming!

More about CBM UK’s Emergency Nepal Appeal

Dave Taylor

By Dave Taylor

Apr 7th 2015

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What makes a person with disability so precious to God?

Categories: Benjamin, CBM, Cerebral Palsy, Child, Disability

My precious son, Benjamin died on May 11th 2013, aged 16. Benjamin lived with quadriplegic cerebral palsy. In his case this meant being a wheelchair user, being non-verbal, being tube fed into his stomach via a gastrostomy and being physically dependent for all his basic needs.

Benjamin

Dave's precious son, Benjamin.

But like millions of people living with a disability around the world, Benjamin was a shining light to those who knew him, a portal through which people got a glimpse of grace, and the very heart of God. He had an extra special awareness of God in his own life and could see Him in the lives of others. I haven’t got the space here to tell you how that panned out in Benjamin’s life, but I do want to explore what it is that makes people with disability so precious to God.

Theologian Richard Rohr says this ‘The Bible is extraordinary because it repeatedly and invariably favours the people on the bottom, and not the people on the top.

The Church, and society in general, have moved a long way from this Biblical solidarity with the powerless. Once it was at the centre of the establishment and had, in the main, lost its revolutionary identity, the Church became a bit embarrassed by this powerless, bleeding, crucified loser from Galilee, Jesus. He ended up an accused criminal for goodness sake and died that way, disempowered, disgraced, disabled, on a cross.

Sure, we have maintained our worship of Him, but who wants to end up like Jesus? Who wants to be ridiculed, treated, at best, like a second class citizen? Who wants to be pushed, ignored, and spoken about as if they weren’t there, having to listen to what is being said about them?

There is something that is more than a bit weird about the majority of us! Many of us worship this illegitimate, Palestinian street kid who was born surrounded by dung in an animal trough. The vast majority of us at least acknowledge His existence at Christmas, some of us may take pride in the fact that we follow ‘The Son of God,’ we may consider ourselves to be compassionate beings, but in the nitty-gritty of daily life we want to be winners, successful, on top.

Yet it was to those who were defiled, considered by the religious people of the day to be ‘unclean’, that Jesus not only hung out with but found a special place in His heart for.

Who are those people in today’s world? Those with learning and physical disabilities, minority groups, women (in some cultures), refugees, the addicted, people who are trafficked, those persecuted for their sexual orientation, the prisoner, the homeless – in fact anybody who does not fit nicely into a neatly constructed social system.

But it is those very people, the people that God is so passionate about, who are the most effective demonstrators of the Gospel.

As Fr. Richard Rohr puts it ‘these are the ones who represent what we are most afraid of within ourselves, what we most deny within ourselves.’

People with a disability were, and I would argue, still are, partners in the ministry of Jesus: The man of Luke 5:19 who was lowered by his friends through a hole in the roof to meet Jesus is one example. Yes, of course, his friends helped him – that’s what friends do – but it was the man with a disability who not only encountered Jesus himself, but was the gateway through which his mates also had an encounter!

Or there’s the man who is blind in John 9:1. When asked by his disciples who it was that had sinned, the man himself or his parents, Jesus explained that the man was this way so that the Kingdom of God could be seen?

How inspiring! How counter-cultural. CBM UK and our grassroots Partners are with people with various disabilities, living in the poorest communities on the planet. CBM is about enabling, empowering these people to have access to their rights and potential, but it is the person with the disability who is the inspiration, and the portal through which we, and many others besides, get a glimpse of grace.

Rosi Jack

By Rosi

Mar 13th 2015

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Celebrating a mother’s love and care – Mother’s Day

Categories: CBM, Child, People with disabilities, Poverty, Uganda

As the UK celebrates Mothering Sunday this weekend, 15th March, we’d like to tell you about one very special mother. Roy is 26 years old and has four children. She lives with her husband Ronald and four children in a remote village in Uganda, East Africa, about 100km northeast of the capital, Kampala.

Roy encourages Denis to drink some tea after surgery

Roy encourages Denis to drink some tea after surgery

Like millions of mothers around the world, Roy works hard to support and care for her children. It’s not easy to bring in enough money for the day-to-day essentials and school fees for her two older children – primary education is not free in Uganda. She and Ronald eke out a living growing sweet potatoes, maize and beans and making bricks.

But what makes Roy particularly amazing is that one of her four children – Denis, aged 8 – is actually her half-brother. He came to live with Roy and Ronald just a year ago. We’ve been sharing Denis’ story recently as thanks to CBM supporters, he is currently being treated for Blount’s Disease, which causes his legs to bend and makes walking slow and painful.

Denis had been abandoned by his biological mother and was living with his father.  But he was not treated well.“While all other children at my father’s place were sent to school, Denis was neglected. He didn’t bring the boy to a doctor or send him to school. Instead the father gave him funny and abusive names because of his disability. He has even beaten the boy”, explains Roy.

Sadly, due to the stigma attached to disability and the lack of support and education for parents, this story is all too common. But Roy looked at Denis and saw a boy who needed love and care. She took him in and is now mother to him, along with her three other children.

Without treatment, Roy knows that Denis’ future would probably be bleak. “If he remains with this condition he will face very difficult times in future. He may never be independent. He may need help at all times. He will have a lot of pain and his mobility will always be limited. And he might never find a woman who wants to marry him”.

But the treatment for Blounts’ Disease is far from easy for an 8 year-old to go through.  Denis spent a tearful night in hospital before his surgery, a long way from home.  Since initial surgery to straighten his leg, he has to wear a metal brace or “fixator” on his leg, with daily physiotherapy exercises that often cause him pain.

Roy learns how to help Denis with his physiotherapy exercises

Roy learns how to help Denis with his physiotherapy exercises

It’s hard to imagine how a child could go through treatment like Denis’ without a mother’s love and support. Roy is with him every step of the way. At hospital, hers was the first face he saw when waking up from surgery, encouraging him to drink some tea and then have a rest. Before travelling home with him, she learned about the exercises he must do to ensure that his leg heals strong.  Every day, she encourages him to do his exercises, encouraging him to persevere in spite of the pain.  She must also work hard to help Denis keep his wound clean to prevent infection – not easy when you live in a dusty environment with no electricity or running water at home.

CBM supporters, outreach workers and doctors are all playing a vital role in helping Denis on his treatment journey, which is vital for him to build a better future. But without Roy by his side, showing him a true mother’s love and care,  none of this would be possible.

More about Denis’ journey of hope.

Roy helps Denis walk with his crutches

Roy helps Denis walk with his crutches

Denis, Roy and family at home

Denis, Roy and family at home

Dave Taylor

By Dave Taylor

Mar 3rd 2015

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The cost of twiglets

Categories: CBM, climate change, Development, Disability Inclusion, Inclusive, People with disabilities

A packet of twiglets costs the same as a month's savings for a farmer in Madhya Pradesh

I’ve just returned from a trip to India where I visited one of our CBM partners, Naman Sewa Samiti, in rural poor Madyha Pradesh. I was there to visit an inspiring project, Inclusive Organic Farming. On my outward journey, at Heathrow Airport, I bought a packet of twiglets; little did I know then, how valuable they were!

Betul District in Madhya Pradesh, is deemed by the Indian government to be one of 250 poorest areas in the whole of the country. To live here is to know what it is like to lack clean water, to live in poverty, and to struggle for hope.

Imagine then, living against this backdrop with a disability. There is no NHS, no benefit system. Yes, extended family and the sense of community are impressive support systems, that have long since disappeared from the so-called ‘developed’ world, but in rural India, despite being officially outlawed, the deeply-rooted caste system is strong and pervades religious belief.

Slum community, Betul - the poorest place in one of India's poorest regions

This is not good news for the person with a disability. Some see them as having bad karma, people guilty of some misdemeanour in a previous life.This means that discrimination abounds towards  people with a disability. Too often, they are disempowered, considered to be of far less value to employers, and sometimes, abandoned in their home or pushed out to beg on the street.

Inclusive Organic Farming

CBM UK Partner Naman Sewa Samiti has been working with with people with diabilities in the area since 1994. Historically this has been done through spice making, cooperative and credit banking, self help groups and health education.

Since 2004 Naman has been working with farmers living with a disability, or those caring for a family member with a disability, and empowering them in a new, accessible, far more cost-effective and productive way of farming; organic farming. The results have been stunning. The stories of transformation moving and inspiring.

Take Gajanand and Sangwata for example. Proud parents to twin boys Atul and Praful. Their boys were born with extra special needs, and life has been a struggle. Like most people in the area they are farmers. Farming is difficult enough, but throw in twins into the equation, especially twins with extra needs and challenges and, well, you can imagine.

When the boys were 8, their mum and dad had to make the gut-wrenching decision to  send them away to a residential special school, miles from the famiily home. The lack of transport meant that Gajanand and Sangwata did not see their precious boys for weeks, even months at a time. Even if they could have got there, they were in financial dire straits brought on by their inability to pay for the chemicals to sustain their farming. They were desperate.

Gajanand and Sangwata - working for their boys' future

One day a field-worker from CBM UK Partner, Naman, got to hear of their plight. The couple were introduced to Inclusive Organic Farming. Over the following year, their fortunes were turned around. They came to realise that organic farming, a method in this part of the world that uses plentiful natural resources such as animal dung and aromatic leaves, would cost them next to nothing. They applied, were interviewed, and joined the programme, one that involves checks/inspections, transparency and accountability.

Gajanand and Sangwata were able to grow their customer base, sell at the market and earn more. The small savings that they have been able to make has resulted in more visits to see their boys, and enabled them to put aside some money to contribute to their sons’ future security.

Not only that, they are both now involved in running groups for other parents and farmers who find themselves facing similar struggles.

The ugly face of poverty

I have seen many times, the ugly face of poverty, and how it blights beautiful people. I am sick of it. I hate it. Seems to me we have three fundamental choices that confront us individually and as a society. We can ignore it, pretend that over two thirds of the planet’s population do not live this way, we can see it and choose to do nothing about it, paralysed by our own lack of resources or the sheer size of the task before us, or we can try to play our small part in eradicating the obscenity and injustice of poverty.

I am so grateful to CBM UK that they consider I have a ‘few tools in the box’ to play my part. But if poverty is going to be tackled we all need to be on board. If we are going to see a fairer allocation of resources and wealth, then those of us who are in a privileged position to generate some, should, in my opinion, give some of that away. Actually it’s not all about giving, because there is something in the way that we are wired, that makes US, that makes me, feel good when we give. Giving is receving. Who doesn’t want to feel good? Who doesn’t like receiving something?

I want to shamelessly pull on your heart strings (and your purse strings for that matter). Look into the eyes of Raja, aged 6, living in a slum with a learning disability. Aged 6! He’s gorgeous, beautiful, but poverty has got him, and millions like him, around the throat and is strangling his life and hope for the future.

Humour me, just for 30 seconds. Look into Raja’s stunning eyes, and think. Think about yourself, think about your family, your loved ones, your friends. Then look up and give thanks for the roof that is over your head, and as you look up, offer up a thought/prayer for Raja, and ask how you can help, how you can play your part in loosening the grip of poverty.

Raja, aged 6, he wants to be a cricketer! He has a profound learning disability and lives with his mum in a slum community

New York advocacy updates

Categories: Adult, Advocacy, Beyond 2015, CBM, Development, Post-2015, PWD, SDGs

On 9-11 February, I was part of a group in New York, USA, advocating for the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the post-2015 development framework. Orsolya Bartha (The International Disability Alliance) and I were quite fortunate this week to collaborate with Andrew Griffiths from Sightsavers who is also an Executive Committee Co-Chair of Beyond 2015.

Beyond 2015 is a global civil society campaign, pushing for a strong and legitimate post-2015 development framework. In NY, we work closely with Beyond 2015 in our joint advocacy as civil society stakeholders at the United Nations. More than 1000 organisations participate in Beyond 2015 from more than 130 countries representing 41 countries in Africa, 29 countries in Asia and the Pacific, 35 countries in Europe, 2 countries in North America and 26 countries in Latin America. CBM International, CBM Australia, CBM Canada and CBM UK are all participating organisations in Beyond 2015.

We met with an array of Member States, including: Bangladesh, Brazil, Cameroon, the People’s Republic of China, Ireland, Israel, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, and the United Kingdom. We received strong support for the inclusion of persons with disabilities from these meetings. In addition, once again we were told that persons with disabilities are a very strong advocacy group at the UN. Specifically, Brazil stated that persons with disabilities are the most organised of all advocacy groups at the UN. Thank you, Brazil!

Ms. Catalina Devandas Aguilar, Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities, presenting at Commission for Social Development.

We were particularly positive about meeting with the Permanent Mission of the People’s Republic of China to the UN since it is the first time we had the opportunity to meet with this important Member State. The People’s Republic of China is very supportive of persons with disabilities in the post-2015 development process, in particular in areas of poverty eradication, employment, health, and education. In our meeting we learnt that there are approximately 88 million persons with disabilities living in China and that the China Disabled Persons’ Federation is quite active and collaborates with the government. Specifically, Peng Liyuan, the wife of the Chinese President Xi Jinping, has called for a “more just, tolerant and sustainable environment for the development of disabled people.”

In addition to the afore-mentioned post-2015 events, the 53rd Session of the Commission for Social Development also took place in NY on 4-13 February. Member States that explicitly referenced persons with disabilities include: Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Egypt, the EU, Finland, Iran, Italy, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Nepal, Pakistan, Republic of Korea, Sweden, and Viet Nam. I had the lovely opportunity to speak with Ms. Catalina Devandas Aguilar, Special Rapporteur on the rights of persons with disabilities who gave a fantastic presentation at the session. Watch the video of Ms. Devandas’ presentation. We greatly look forward to working with you in the coming months and years!

Elizabeth Lockwood is CBM’s UN Advocacy Officer based in New York. Elizabeth focuses on developing advocacy strategies to raise awareness, network, build capacity, and lobby for the rights of persons with disabilities at the UN level in relation to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and Inclusive Development. This post first appeared on the CBM International blog.