Category Archives: climate change

Dave Taylor

By Dave Taylor

Mar 3rd 2015

Author Feed

The cost of twiglets

Categories: CBM, climate change, Development, Disability Inclusion, Inclusive, People with disabilities

A packet of twiglets costs the same as a month's savings for a farmer in Madhya Pradesh

I’ve just returned from a trip to India where I visited one of our CBM partners, Naman Sewa Samiti, in rural poor Madyha Pradesh. I was there to visit an inspiring project, Inclusive Organic Farming. On my outward journey, at Heathrow Airport, I bought a packet of twiglets; little did I know then, how valuable they were!

Betul District in Madhya Pradesh, is deemed by the Indian government to be one of 250 poorest areas in the whole of the country. To live here is to know what it is like to lack clean water, to live in poverty, and to struggle for hope.

Imagine then, living against this backdrop with a disability. There is no NHS, no benefit system. Yes, extended family and the sense of community are impressive support systems, that have long since disappeared from the so-called ‘developed’ world, but in rural India, despite being officially outlawed, the deeply-rooted caste system is strong and pervades religious belief.

Slum community, Betul - the poorest place in one of India's poorest regions

This is not good news for the person with a disability. Some see them as having bad karma, people guilty of some misdemeanour in a previous life.This means that discrimination abounds towards  people with a disability. Too often, they are disempowered, considered to be of far less value to employers, and sometimes, abandoned in their home or pushed out to beg on the street.

Inclusive Organic Farming

CBM UK Partner Naman Sewa Samiti has been working with with people with diabilities in the area since 1994. Historically this has been done through spice making, cooperative and credit banking, self help groups and health education.

Since 2004 Naman has been working with farmers living with a disability, or those caring for a family member with a disability, and empowering them in a new, accessible, far more cost-effective and productive way of farming; organic farming. The results have been stunning. The stories of transformation moving and inspiring.

Take Gajanand and Sangwata for example. Proud parents to twin boys Atul and Praful. Their boys were born with extra special needs, and life has been a struggle. Like most people in the area they are farmers. Farming is difficult enough, but throw in twins into the equation, especially twins with extra needs and challenges and, well, you can imagine.

When the boys were 8, their mum and dad had to make the gut-wrenching decision to  send them away to a residential special school, miles from the famiily home. The lack of transport meant that Gajanand and Sangwata did not see their precious boys for weeks, even months at a time. Even if they could have got there, they were in financial dire straits brought on by their inability to pay for the chemicals to sustain their farming. They were desperate.

Gajanand and Sangwata - working for their boys' future

One day a field-worker from CBM UK Partner, Naman, got to hear of their plight. The couple were introduced to Inclusive Organic Farming. Over the following year, their fortunes were turned around. They came to realise that organic farming, a method in this part of the world that uses plentiful natural resources such as animal dung and aromatic leaves, would cost them next to nothing. They applied, were interviewed, and joined the programme, one that involves checks/inspections, transparency and accountability.

Gajanand and Sangwata were able to grow their customer base, sell at the market and earn more. The small savings that they have been able to make has resulted in more visits to see their boys, and enabled them to put aside some money to contribute to their sons’ future security.

Not only that, they are both now involved in running groups for other parents and farmers who find themselves facing similar struggles.

The ugly face of poverty

I have seen many times, the ugly face of poverty, and how it blights beautiful people. I am sick of it. I hate it. Seems to me we have three fundamental choices that confront us individually and as a society. We can ignore it, pretend that over two thirds of the planet’s population do not live this way, we can see it and choose to do nothing about it, paralysed by our own lack of resources or the sheer size of the task before us, or we can try to play our small part in eradicating the obscenity and injustice of poverty.

I am so grateful to CBM UK that they consider I have a ‘few tools in the box’ to play my part. But if poverty is going to be tackled we all need to be on board. If we are going to see a fairer allocation of resources and wealth, then those of us who are in a privileged position to generate some, should, in my opinion, give some of that away. Actually it’s not all about giving, because there is something in the way that we are wired, that makes US, that makes me, feel good when we give. Giving is receving. Who doesn’t want to feel good? Who doesn’t like receiving something?

I want to shamelessly pull on your heart strings (and your purse strings for that matter). Look into the eyes of Raja, aged 6, living in a slum with a learning disability. Aged 6! He’s gorgeous, beautiful, but poverty has got him, and millions like him, around the throat and is strangling his life and hope for the future.

Humour me, just for 30 seconds. Look into Raja’s stunning eyes, and think. Think about yourself, think about your family, your loved ones, your friends. Then look up and give thanks for the roof that is over your head, and as you look up, offer up a thought/prayer for Raja, and ask how you can help, how you can play your part in loosening the grip of poverty.

Raja, aged 6, he wants to be a cricketer! He has a profound learning disability and lives with his mum in a slum community

Climate Change and People with Disabilities

Categories: CBM, climate change, DRR, Economy, Events, People with disabilities, Post-2015, UN

On Sunday 21 September, more than 300,000 marchers flooded the streets of New York City making it the largest climate change march in history and putting this important issue on the top of the global agenda. In addition, in conjunction to the opening of the 69th UN General Assembly, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon hosted the UN Climate Summit on Tuesday, 23 September. It was lovely timing since it was also the Fall Equinox (Spring Equinox for my friends in the Southern Hemisphere – !Hola Uruguay!)

Due to this high-level event, climate change has been a pervasive topic at the UN and in NYC and this theme will continue to be important as the post-2015 development agenda progresses. One example is that the newly appointed President of General Assembly, Sam Kutesa, will hold a High-level Event on Combating Climate Change in June 2015.

With this increased emphasis on climate change and related disaster risk reduction (DRR) – in the post-2015 process, it is crucial that persons with disabilities are included in these conversations, debates and initiatives. Why is this important?

It is important because weather-related disasters are increasing in number and severity and the number of people affected by them has risen. Disasters and their aftermath have a huge impact on persons with disabilities who are among the most vulnerable in an emergency, sustaining disproportionately higher rates of morbidity and mortality, and at the same time being among those least able to access emergency support. For example, research indicates that the mortality rate among persons with disabilities was twice that of the rest of the population during the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami (UN, 2013). Moreover, for every person that dies during a disaster, it is estimated that three people sustain an injury, many causing long-term disabilities, such as the case in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake in which approximately 200,000 people are expected to live with long-term disabilities as a result of injuries (UN Enable, 2013).

Persons with disabilities are often forgotten, and most likely to be abandoned during disasters (DiDRRN, 2013)as well as more likely to be invisible and overlooked in emergency relief operations (Choy, 2009). When the emergency hits they may have difficulty reaching safe areas, become separated from family and friends which is a key to survival and coping, have trouble accessing vital emergency information, or lose assistive devices such as wheelchairs, crutches, prostheses, white canes or hearing aids. In addition, moving and transferring persons with disabilities requires handling techniques to avoid injury or further injury. Yet, the first-ever UN global survey of persons living with disabilities and how they cope with disasters indicates that the percentage of those with disabilities who could evacuate with no difficulty almost doubles if they were given sufficient time. This underlines the importance of early warning systems and ensuring that warnings reach all members of the community regardless of any mobility or communication barriers (UNISDR, 2013).

For the few who are evacuated, shelters are not accessible and consequently survivors with disabilities are also excluded from the emergency responses: including food, basic needs and health support. In addition, in the aftermath of a disaster, the damage to infrastructure caused by extreme weather events can reduce or completely remove access and safe mobility. Inclusive practice in all relief operations is needed to ensure that response and service delivery is not fragmented but mindful of all sources of vulnerability (Kett & Scherrer, 2009).

Recommendations

  • Strong advocacy by and with persons with disabilities is needed to ensure disability inclusion is a key criterion in all emergency relief operations
  • The evidence base concerning the vulnerability of persons with disabilities in weather-related emergencies, and key factors, which create resilience, need to be greatly strengthened, with key messages disseminated.
  • Evaluations of both emergency and development programmes, in areas affected by a changing climate, need to clearly include disability in their terms of reference.
  • Early warning systems need to ensure that warnings reach all members of the community, including persons with disabilities regardless of mobility or communication barriers.
  • In the reconstruction phase following severe weather and other emergencies, it is essential that universal accessibility standards are applied in all public buildings and spaces, water and sanitation points and for the homes where people with mobility disabilities live.

References

Choy, R. (2009). Disasters are always inclusive: Vulnerability in humanitarian crises, Development Bulletin, Special Issue No. 73, April 2009, Development Studies Network, ANU, Canberra.

DiDRRN. (2013) Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Simulation Exercise. From: www. didrrn.net/home/

Kett, M and Scherrer, V. (2009). The Impact of Climate Change on People with Disabilities. Report of e-discussion hosted by The Global Partnership for Disability & Development (GPDD) and The World Bank (Human Development Network – Social Protection/Disability & Development Team).

UN. (2013). Panel Discussion on Disaster resilience and disability: ensuring equality and inclusion. United Nations Headquarters on October 10, 2013.

UN Enable. (2013). Disability, natural disasters and emergency situations: A need to include persons with disabilities. From: www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=1546

UNISDR. (2013, October 10). UN Global Survey Explains Why So Many People Living with Disabilities Die in Disasters. [Press release 2013/29].