Category Archives: Training

Inclusive humanitarian response – change is coming!

Categories: CBM, Disability, Disability Inclusion, DRR, Earthquake, Emergency Appeal, Inclusive, Nepal, People with disabilities, Training, Uncategorized

I arrived in Nepal on May 12th, some hours after the massive aftershock that caused more casualties and a number of additional damages to properties and infrastructure.

I could see in the faces of people how their lives were shaken again, and how they didn’t see where and how to ensure the safety of themselves and their families. My first night in Kathmandu was broken by a number of aftershocks that woke me up and made me run outside in search of safety.

Though earthquakes are not new to me, every time it makes me realise how frightening they are, bringing a feeling of helplessness.

Three weeks later, life has become quasi-normal in Kathmandu, with its traffic jams, crowds in the street, shops and restaurants all open. If you don’t travel to affected areas you won’t see that two major earthquakes hit the city only few weeks back. Though people are still talking a lot about them and every day small aftershocks remind all of us that it has happened.

Working with partners – ensuring inclusion

It’s been three weeks of working with partners to provide support to the most affected people, to raise awareness about persons with disabilities and older people and to make sure that all of them are included and have equal access to relief, despite the challenges posed by isolated and remote villages and the upcoming rainy season.

Receiving medicines at a relief camp organized by CBM partner HRDC (Hospital and Rehabilitation Centre for Disabled Children)

Our partners are doing a great job to save lives and contribute to the effort made to assist people in need through trauma care and rehabilitation, organising medical outreach camps, providing psychosocial support – trying to help people to regain independence and normality in their lives. However, we still hear stories from persons with disabilities and older people not being able to access distribution points and being left behind – unintentionally – by relief stakeholders. It is a hard job to reach out to the most at-risk, as often they are not informed, cannot reach the front of the queue and their voices are not heard.

What would you do?

What would you do to find food if you are an 80 year-old man living more than a three-hour walk far from the main road and next city? You will walk downhill, hoping to access a relief package, and then find out that you have to carry a 30 kg bag back uphill …and that you can’t do it. You will seek support, but all other people are also too busy trying to survive to help you.

What would you do if you are a blind person trying to find out where distributions are happening and how to access them, only to discover that you have to compete to be front of the queue as there are not enough supplies for all? Obviously you’ll be at a disadvantage, and most likely you’ll lose out.

What would you do if you are a deaf person, having been transferred by helicopter to Kathmandu for trauma care and have no clue of what is happening to you as no one can communicate with you?

These are only few stories, but many more like this are reported every day…

It is great that donors and organisations are moving towards inclusive policies and frameworks, but exclusion happens on the field. What would you do if you were that relief worker and have limited aid to distribute? Field workers must be supported to turn inclusive policies into inclusive humanitarian action.

Advocating for inclusion

CBM works with our partner the National Federation of Disabled in Nepal (NFDN), supporting them to identify persons with disability and older people and assess their needs to then mobilise humanitarian stakeholders to respond to them. It is very encouraging as many of these organisations are willing to make the extra effort, but lack knowledge or information to ensure inclusion.

Bhojraj Ghimire, CIL Kathmandu (checked shirt) takes part in the workshop on disability inclusion organised by CBM and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in Kathmandu

Bhojraj Ghimire, CIL Kathmandu (checked shirt) takes part in the workshop on disability inclusion organised by CBM and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in Kathmandu

Early last week I gave a two-hour orientation on disability inclusion to Red Cross staff, and the head of the delegation said:

“The Red Cross movement was created to help the most difficult to reach and the ones who couldn’t care for themselves, and yet in our response we reach only the easy one. We need to make the extra effort to access all those who are living in remote areas, who are facing barriers to access relief and whose rights we should protect.”

Well, this kind of statement and willingness to walk the extra miles is very encouraging as it will support the relief worker to pay attention and develop the mechanisms to help the older man to carry home his 30 Kg of goods, the blind person to find the distribution point and be in front of the queue or the deaf person to access a sign language interpreter to understand what is happening to him and get news from his family.

I will travel back to Europe soon but I’m confident that our partners will continue to raise their voices and to make them heard by all. Change is coming!

More about CBM UK’s Emergency Nepal Appeal

Kirsty Smith

By Kirsty Smith

Jan 28th 2015

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“Inclusion is not just about disability, inclusion is about everybody.”

Categories: Advocacy, CRPD, Development, Disability Inclusion, Inclusive, People with disabilities, Training, Uncategorized

I’m in Bangkok this week taking part in the first CBM joint Disability Inclusive Development (DID) training – ensuring that people with disabilities are included and involved in all development activity. The workshop is aimed at sharing international experiences of disability inclusive development and discussing good practice.

The workshop started today with participants from all nine CBM regions, four member associations, and international office to share experiences, good practice, resources, expertise, but also challenges faced whilst working towards disability inclusion.

The first day’s main focus was learning from examples from six regions in sessions that were facilitated in a very lively and creative manner.

A common point of discussion was moving from a mere welfare approach to a rights based development approach along the empowerment framework, and from a bilateral cooperation between CBM and the organisations it supports towards a true partnership that promotes mutual learning between the organisations.

A key issue discussed was the alliance with Disabled People’s Organisations which, because of their expertise, have an important role in the promotion of inclusion. Different strategies and methodologies for their involvement were discussed, and it was remarked that CBM has to not only look inwards but also acknowledge the different roles of stakeholders to ensure we draw on their specific strengths.

CBM’s role was seen to facilitate the link between disability stakeholders, as well as with mainstream organisations, governments, technical and finance partners. It was acknowledged that in order to influence change, DPOs require capacity development to enhance their professionalism.

The benefits of involvement of DPOs on these different levels are:

  • Increased self-esteem
  • Improved academic, vocational and/or professional skills
  • Improved socialisation
  • Improved awareness of disability rights, participation and accessibility
  • Increased understanding of structures and processes
  • Improved leadership skills
  • Increased understanding of relations on all levels, from grassroots to global

These will together lead to increased empowerment.

One of the important learnings of the day was the importance of gender sensitivity in our work, for example not just disaggregation of data by gender but also breaking down the data for people with disabilities by gender, keeping the gender lens during implementation, featuring men in our documentation and footage, and ensuring men are allies.

Quote of the day:

“It causes the partner problems if they learn that I am coming to visit them.” (from a CBM staff member using a wheelchair)

“Inclusion is not just about disability, inclusion is about everybody.” (from a CBM staff member)

Laura Gore

By Laura Gore

Jan 9th 2015

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Angelito de diós – Tiny Jeick’s fight for sight

Categories: Blindness, Child, Training, Uncategorized, Vision 2020

I’m the Programme Manager for CBM UK and I visited Luz and her family when I was in Peru. I am enclosing a short report that I wrote after my visit.…

I met Jeick and his mother Luz at their home in Lima, Peru, where they live with Luz’s mother, four brothers and sisters and their children. A small space for such a large family.

Luz explained about the traumatic birth of Jeick which resulted in him being born prematurely at 27 weeks, weighing just over 1kg.  Luz became upset as she described the experience which bought back memories of how she felt at the time, not knowing if her son was going to live or die, let alone see.

Luz had to leave Jeick in hospital after just three days, where he stayed for a further two months.  She struggled to look after her other two children and visit the hospital every day to see Jeick. It took Luz an hour and a half to reach the hospital each day and the costs soon started to add up.

Luz showed us photos of Jeick from when he was born and still in an incubator. He looked so tiny and vulnerable.

Jeick was regularly screened for ROP where staff had been trained by CBM’s partners in Lima.  At three months old he was diagnosed with ROP and given an urgent appointment.   But by this point Luz could not afford to pay for the transport to hospital and so they could not make this first appointment.

When we stepped in to pay for her transport, our ophthalmologist was able to urgently conduct the laser treatment and after a short stay in hospital Jeick was able to return home.

It’s been over four months now since Jeick had his treatment and his vision continues to develop extremely well; early signs are that he will have good eye sight and potentially not even require glasses.

Luz told us how thankful she was for the treatment and support she received from CBM It was a real inspiration to meet Luz and hear about her experience and how CBM had made such a vital difference to their lives – not only had we provided sight saving treatment, but we also supported Luz in the rehabilitation process. Luz says she is very grateful for the treatment that Jeick received thanks to the programme and is very happy that her “angelito de diós” (little angel of God) is doing so well now.

Seeing Jeick now, you would never know what a traumatic experience he and his family went through. A real pleasure to see such a happy family.

Steve Mannion

By Steve Mannion

Jul 5th 2012

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Ponseti training in Antsirabe

Categories: Adult, CBM, Child, Clubfoot, Madagascar, Surgery, Training
Ponseti Casting at Antsirabe course

Ponseti Casting at Antsirabe course. Photo © Steve Mannion

Next stop was Antsirabe, 3 hours drive south of Antananarivo at CRMM (Centre du Reeducation Mortrice de Madagascar) – a dedicated orthopaedic disability hospital. Here we are running a ponseti training course for 26 practitioners, and operating on neglected clubfoot surgical cases.

CRMM here, and CAM in Antananarivo are “pilot centres” for the Madagascar Clubfoot Project. With the support of CBM, we will make further visits over the next 12 months and then we’ll select a local faculty of clubfoot trainers who will be able to instruct clubfoot practitioners throughout Madagascar.

The vision is to create a national network of clubfoot treatment centres – ensuring that every child born with clubfoot in Madagascar will have access to treatment and that the disability of clubfoot will be prevented. CBM desperately needs ongoing funding in able to achieve this goal.

Babies & participants at Antsirabe Ponseti course

Babies & participants at Antsirabe Ponseti course. Photo © Steve Mannion

Steve Mannion

By Steve Mannion

May 31st 2012

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Ponseti training in Madagascar

Categories: CBM, Child, Clubfoot, Madagascar, Training

I’m Steve Mannion, a Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon with CBM.

Madagascar, a country of 24 million people is estimated to have over 15,000 children and adults suffering the disability of neglected clubfoot, with nearly 1000 babies being born with the clubfoot each year. Currently there is no coordinated national project for clubfoot treatment, there are very few trained practitioners trained in the Ponseti method (the most effective method of treatment in babies), and only one surgeon in the entire country with the skills to operate on neglected cases.

Ponseti training Madagascar

Training the team in the Ponseti method. It's messy work making plaster casts, but it's so important to train local staff in this technique. Photo © Steve Mannion

I have been invited to conduct training courses and demonstrate neglected clubfoot surgery at two centres in Madagascar, as CBM is determined to eliminate clubfoot disability in Madagascar.

On this trip we conducted a Ponseti training course at CAM, the Centre d’Appairallage de Madagascar, the major rehabilitation clinic in the nation’s capital Antananarivo.

25 practitioners attended the course, a combination of surgeons, rehabilitation doctors, physiotherapists and orthotic (brace) technicians. I had faculty assistance from Michiel Steenbeeck, a CBM advisor and expert in brace production and Dr Leonard Banza, a CBM orthopaedic surgeon working in Malawi.

As part of the course, 20 babies with clubfoot were assessed and casted.  Their continued treatment will be undertaken at CAM, funded by CBM.
15 cases of neglected clubfoot were also assessed with 5 cases (9 feet) being selected for operations which were undertaken later.
In theatre I was able to instruct a Malagasy paediatric surgeon, Dr Raherison, in the techniques of neglected clubfoot surgery and he undertook the later cases under my supervision.

We’ve been busy in Antananarivo, but it’s been so worthwhile. Next, we’ll be heading to Antsirabe…

Clubfoot surgery team, Antananarivo, Madagascar

Clubfoot surgery team, Antananarivo, Madagascar. Photo © Steve Mannion

Will

By Dr Will Dean

Feb 20th 2010

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New cataract surgeon!

Categories: Cataract, Surgery, Training

Ephraim Kambewa, Cataract Surgeon

One of the greatest aspects of working here at Nkhoma is the team at the Eye Hospital. I have the pleasure of working with a team of nearly 40 dedicated nurses, patient attendants, drivers, administrative staff; and one clinical officer, Mr Ephraim Kambewa.

I mention Mr Kambewa especially, as he has returned after 18 months training in Tanzania last year, and has graduated now as a qualified Senior ophthalmic clinical officer Cataract Surgeon! It was thanks to cbm that his training was possible.

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